Ascidia zara

Ascidia zara Oka, 1935

Languages: English

Overview

Description

This species is a simple, solitary ascidian, with a thin outer covering or tunic. Overall shape is typically described as irregular or oblong; and although the body is longer than wide and measures 2-6 cm in length, this species attaches to the substrate along its side rather than its base, resulting in a compressed or flattened appearance. The tunic surface is covered with small bumps or finger-like projections (papillae); however in some individuals, these papillae may appear only around the siphons. Both the oral and atrial siphons are positioned in the anterior third of the body. Overall color varies from translucent to pale yellow or beige, but often the tunic is covered with other fouling organisms or debris. Eggs are red in color.

Author(s): Frey, Melissa
Rights holder(s): Frey, Melissa

Description

Look Alikes

In the Northeast Pacific, Ascidia zara is most similar to other ascidiid tunicates, including A. ceratodes (Huntsman, 1912), A. columbiana (Huntsman, 1912), A. paratropa (Huntsman, 1912), and another non-native species documented from the region, Ascidia sp. Lambert & Lambert 1998.

Author(s): Frey, Melissa
Rights holder(s): Frey, Melissa

Ecology and Distribution

Distribution

Ascidia zara has been introduced to the Northeast Pacific, and is present at several sites in central and southern California. Its native geographical range extends across the Northwest Pacific, including Japan.

Author(s): Frey, Melissa
Rights holder(s): Frey, Melissa

Taxonomy

  • Phallusia suensoni Traudstedt, 1885 (synonym)

References

Carlton, J. T. (2007).  The Light and Smith Manual: Intertidal Invertebrates from Central California to Oregon. 1001. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press.
Lambert, C. C., & Lambert G. (1998).  Non-indigenous ascidians in southern California harbors and marinas. Marine Biology. 130, 675-688.
Lambert, C. C., & Lambert G. (2003).  Persistence and differential distribution of nonindigenous ascidians in harbors of the Southern California Bight. Marine Ecology Progress Series. 259, 145-161.
Ruiz, G. M., Fofonoff P. W., Steves B., Foss S. F., & Shiba S. N. (2011).  Marine invasion history and vector analysis of California: a hotspot for western North America. Diversity and Distributions. 17, 362-373.