Barentsia benedeni

Barentsia benedeni (Foettinger, 1887)

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Overview

Description

This colonial kamptozoan consists of numerous individual zooids that are connected basally by stolons. Each zooid is made up of a calyx and a stalk, measuring approximately 2 mm in total height. The cuplike calyx is ringed with ciliated tentacles; these tentacles roll inward when disturbed. Typically, each calyx is oriented obliquely relative to the stalk. Each stalk is composed of long, narrow rigid rods interspaced by one or more short, wide muscular nodes, allowing each zooid to bend. Stalk rods are distinguished by a lack of conspicuous pores. Basal stolons are thin and narrow, measuring 50 μm in diameter, and attach to a variety of substrates or other organisms.

Author(s): Frey, Melissa
Rights holder(s): Frey, Melissa

Description

Look Alikes

In the Northeast Pacific, Barentsia benedeni is most similar to B. parva (O'Donoghue & O'Donoghue, 1923).

Author(s): Frey, Melissa
Rights holder(s): Frey, Melissa

Ecology and Distribution

Distribution

Barentsia benedeni is a cosmopolitan species. In the Northeast Pacific, the species has been recorded at several sites in California and Oregon, including the Salton Sea, Elkhorn Slough, San Francisco Bay, Lake Merritt, and Coos Bay. This species also has been collected from numerous locations around the world, including Europe, Japan, and Australia (Wasson 1997). Its native geographical range remains uncertain, but the species may have originated in Europe (Carlton 1978).

Author(s): Frey, Melissa
Rights holder(s): Frey, Melissa

Habitat

Primarily found in bays and harbours.

Author(s): Frey, Melissa
Rights holder(s): Frey, Melissa

References

Carlton, J. T. (1978).  History, biogeography and ecology of the introduced marine and estuarine invertebrates of the Pacific coast of North America.. Ph.D. Thesis,
Wasson, K. (1997).  Systematic revision of colonial kamptozoans (entoprocts) of the Pacific coast of North America. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. 121, 1-63.